Friday, February 09, 2018

Are you more of a classical musician? Jazz musician? A little bit of both?

This article briefly outlines the differences between playing classical music and playing jazz and how it affects the brain’s activity. It explains that jazz pianists have more flexibility with unexpected chords, whereas classical musicians adapt better to abnormal fingering (in their study, they study the brains of pianists) or choice of technique.


There are clear advantages to learning both types of musical styles, so if there’s a style you’re unfamiliar with, try to dabble in a few others to expand your musical horizons!

Check out the article here

Sunday, February 04, 2018

How to Practice Effectively








This video gives us a take on the science of what happens in our brains when we practice on a daily basis. It goes on to tell us how an effective practice should be consistent, focused and should be attacking the problems. It goes on giving us tips and tricks on how to get the most out of our time and practice.

This video should really inspire us all to go practice, but not just playing through pieces but practicing EFFECTIVELY!

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Watch the Toronto Symphony Orchestra Rehearse!

Image Source: Wikipedia
High school music teachers are invited to bring their students to a morning rehearsal at Roy Thomson Hall to observe the Orchestra's preparations before a concert.
  • This is a unique learning opportunity for students to listen to and learn from professional musicians.
  • Students will be seated in the choir loft directly above the musicians (pending availability) in order to derive the maximum benefit from this experience.
  • Meet a TSO musician during the rehearsal break for a Q&A session about the music, rehearsal, technique, and even life as a professional musician.

For more information, click here!

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Playing a Rubik's Cube - Ted-Ed


This Ted-Ed video explains some mathematical principles that can allow you to make a chord progression using a Rubik’s Cube. For anyone who might be looking for inspiration while composing, this might help push you into a new direction.


The majority of the video explains group theory (which directly relates to how you can group a face on a Rubik’s Cube as well as a chord). Near the end, it describes putting different chords on each face of the cube (ensuring that the notes are different on the column, rows, and diagonal), scrambling up the cube, and then examining one of the faces. With the face that you decide to look at, you write down the chords after every single move you make to the cube. Eventually, it will go to the tonic chord once it has been fully solved, and by then, you would have a long chord progression that you can play around with until hear something you like.